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Original Article

The accessory spleen: prevalence and imaging findings in 1735 consecutuve patients examined by multidetector CT

Authors:

T Romer ,

Department of Radiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland, CH
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W Wiesner

Department of Radiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Clinic Stephanshorn, St. Gallen, Switzerland., CH
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Abstract

Objective: To analyze the prevalence and CT findings of accessory spleens in the normal population. Material and methods: CT-examinations of 1735 consecutive patients, all examined by triple phase 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the abdomen, were retrospectively analyzed with special emphasis on the presence, location and imaging aspects of accessory spleens.

Results: 199 patients showed an accessory spleen (11%). Size of accessory spleens ranged from 3 to 20 mm (mean 10 mm). In 60% the accessory spleen was located at the level of the splenic hilum and in 33% at the level of the lower pole. In 46% the accessory spleen was located medially and in 43% ventrally. 19 patients presented with two (1.1%) and seven patients with three accessory spleens (0.4%), respectively. One patient showed splenosis and one patient showed an enlarged accessory spleen (5 cm) secondary to a splenic apoplexy (i.e. hemorrhagic infarction) of the accessory spleen, caused by torsion.

Conclusion: Accessory spleens may be identified by MDCT in about 11% of patients. Familiarity with normal imaging findings and knowledge on differential diagnoses, possible pathologies and potential pitfalls helps to differentiate from other findings in the upper abdomen.

How to Cite: Romer T, Wiesner W. The accessory spleen: prevalence and imaging findings in 1735 consecutuve patients examined by multidetector CT. Journal of the Belgian Society of Radiology. 2012;95(2):61–5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/jbr-btr.75
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Published on 01 Mar 2012.
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